The Plight of Shrimp-Processing Workers of Southwestern Bangladesh (2012)

The Plight of Shrimp-Processing Workers of Southwestern Bangladesh (2012)

Bangladesh’s labor code addresses pay, working hours, and on-the-job conditions. However, in the shrimp-processing industry, the code is not being adequately enforced. Bangladeshi shrimp-processing workers—the majority of whom are women—still face inadequate health and safety protections at work and receive less than the minimum wage, among other violations of their rights.

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Gender Equality and Labor Movements: Toward a Global Perspective (Rutgers, 2012)

Gender Equality and Labor Movements: Toward a Global Perspective (Rutgers, 2012)

A critical review of the English-language research on gender equality and labor movements highlighting “best practice” case studies around the world most relevant to those engaged in building democratic and humane societies. This Solidarity Center report is part of a multiyear research project, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, to study the informal economy, migration, gender and rule of law together with research partners Rutgers and WIEGO.

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Solidarity Center Gender Programming Manual (2006)

Solidarity Center Gender Programming Manual (2006)

This 70-page handbook incorporates staff insights and experiences into checklists and tools needed to develop programs that redress gender inequity in the workplace, promote leadership roles for women, and move closer to achieving full worker rights.

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The Struggle for Worker Rights in Swaziland (2006)

The Struggle for Worker Rights in Swaziland (2006)

Swazi workers face many challenges, especially women workers, who have a low status in Swazi society and make up a large percentage of the workforce, yet endure discrimination and workplace sexual harassment and violence. Improvements at the workplace cannot be secured until, as the report notes, the Swazi government engages in full democratic reform that allows Swaziland’s people to govern themselves and to exercise their rights to make economic, political and social decisions that affect their lives.

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