Malaysia

Malaysia, worker rights, Solidarity Center

Much of the Solidarity Center’s work in Malaysia involves promoting efforts to enable the millions of migrant workers to engage with and join unions. Credit: Solidarity Center/David Welch

In Malaysia, the Solidarity Center works with trade unions and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around labor law and policy development, supply chain engagement, union organizing, and capacity building.

A major component of the Solidarity Center program in Malaysia involves promoting efforts to enable the millions of migrant workers to engage with and join unions. The Solidarity Center also works to increase the capacity of unions and their accessibility to workers as they seek judicial remedies on rights violations.

Media Contact

Kate Conradt
Communications Director
(+1) 202-974 -8369

 

DOMESTIC WORKERS: Winning Recognition and Protection (2013)

Many domestic workers around the world are vulnerable to exploitation and not recognized by national labor laws. But in the Dominican Republic, domestic workers have campaigned to make gains over the last two decades—and a new Solidarity Center report shows how....

Emergent Solidarities: Labor Movement Responses to Migrant Workers in the Dominican Republic and Jordan (Rutgers, 2013)

This report explores examples of unions making significant change in their approaches to migrant worker organizing and how the Solidarity Center has played a role in shifting union thinking about migrant workers and supporting union engagement and activities. Part one...

‘Never Give up the Struggle’ for Worker Rights

Ramon Alexander Mosquea Rosario, a union leader at Frito Lay/Pepsico worksites in the Dominican Republic, helped form the National Union of Workers of Dominican Frito Lay (SINTRALAYDO), despite nine years of employer harassment, firings and retaliation. He encourages...
Social Justice Unionism: Labor Can Make Change

Social Justice Unionism: Labor Can Make Change

“Informal workers are organizing and they will organize as long as there is injustice and oppression,” says Sue Schurman, distinguished professor of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at Rutgers University. Opening a Solidarity Center book launch and panel...

Book Launch: Informal Workers and Collective Action

Book Launch: Informal Workers and Collective Action

As the number of workers in the informal economy increase around the world, the result is that more and more workers are low paid, with few or no social benefits or job security. In the Dominican Republic, where many in the informal economy are Haitian migrants, the...

Nine-Year Struggle to Form Union ‘Worth It’

Nine-Year Struggle to Form Union ‘Worth It’

After a nine-year struggle to achieve union recognition and their first contract in the Dominican Republic, “it is undeniable that today we are stronger,” says Ramón Mosquea, secretary general of the union, SINTRALAYDO. “I have worked 12 years for this company [Frito...

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