Sisters in solidarity: the communal care of domestic workers in the Middle East

The Domestic Workers Solidarity Network in Jordan is the first initiative of its kind in the country and one of few in the region. The network, whose motto is “Sisters in Solidarity,” aims to serve and support domestic workers through awareness-raising, legal assistance and roundtables in coordination with the Adalah Center for Human Rights Studies.

UN Sanctions and North Korea’s Forgotten Workers

The United Nations Security Council recently adopted Resolution 2371—the latest sanctions on North Korea. In so doing, the Security Council acquiesced to the continuation of the country’s state-sponsored, forced-labor-for-export scheme and abandoned an important opportunity to protect the rights and dignity of workers as defined by UN conventions, writes the Solidarity Center’s Jeff Vogt.

Nepal Quake Recovery, Done Right, Could Ease Migration Pressure

Two years after Nepal’s powerful earthquake, slow pace of reconstruction offers an opportunity for the nation to change its economic model, which leans heavily on remittances from Nepali migrant workers. It is a “unique moment” to create jobs that protect workers’ rights, pay fair wages and boost the economic status of its citizens, according to a new report by U.S.-based groups Solidarity Center and JustJobs Network.

The FIFA Scandal Could Hurt Migrant Workers and Their Families Back Home

As the FIFA corruption scandal widens and pressure builds to move the World Cup from countries tainted by the investigation, a deeper human tragedy may be unfolding: The economically fragile situation of migrant workers who build infrastructure for global sporting events will only worsen if they lose their jobs abroad and have no employment to return to at home, writes the Solidarity Center’s Sonia Mistry.

Cambodia Child Labor Laws Flouted with Fake IDs

Despite national legislation, poverty leads Cambodian families to help children lie about their age to get a job, while factories turn a blind eye to underage workers. Prospects for the workers, most of them female, are not good, according to Dave Welsh, country director for U.S.-based labor rights group the Solidarity Center. “At the end of their career, at the ripe old age of 35, the majority are left with no savings, no transferable skills and very little education,” he says. “The companies are taking the best years of these young women’s lives and working them to exhaustion.”

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