Dominican Republic

Nine-Year Struggle to Form Union ‘Worth It’

After a nine-year struggle to achieve union recognition and their first contract in the Dominican Republic, “it is undeniable that today we are stronger,” says Ramón Mosquea, secretary general of the union, SINTRALAYDO. “I have worked 12 years for this company [Frito Lay/PepsiCo], and I want to tell you how important it was for us… [READ MORE]

Organizing Key to Assisting Migrant Workers

More than 300,000 domestic workers in Hong Kong have migrated from the Philippines, Indonesia and other Southeast Asian countries seeking jobs to support their families. Recent high-profile instances of employer abuse against these domestic workers—unpaid wages, 24/7 working hours, and even physical assault—offer a glimpse into the migrant crisis that recently has focused the world’s… [READ MORE]

Workers of Haitian Descent: A Legacy of Discrimination

Tens of thousands of Dominicans of Haitian descent and Haitian migrant workers face imminent deportation from the Dominican Republic in a “crisis that has been building for many years,” says Cathy Feingold, AFL-CIO International Department director. “There is a long legacy of discrimination against workers and families of Haitian descent,” according to Feingold, who moderated… [READ MORE]

ILO: Failure to Protect Informal-Economy Workers Is Not an Option

  • June 19, 2015
  • Tom Egan

Rarely do governments admit failing their citizens. However, on Friday the 193-member states of the United Nations did just that when they voted to rectify their failure to uphold the rights of workers and to ensure decent working conditions for more than half of the world’s working women and men. By voting for an International… [READ MORE]

Dominicans of Haitian Descent About to Be Deported

Hundreds of thousands of workers in the Dominican Republic without official identification papers have until today to register with the government or face deportation. The move—condemned widely as a violation of human rights—could leave as many as 120,000 Dominican-born and -raised women and men stateless, their future and their ability to earn a living jeopardized…. [READ MORE]

Domestic Workers: ‘Bought and Paid for in the Gulf States’

On a trip to Kuwait two years ago, Nisha Varia from Human Rights Watch visited a hospital where two rooms were filled with injured domestic workers who had tried to escape from their employers’ homes. Trapped in abusive situations, the women jumped from windows or were beaten by employers as they sought to leave. The… [READ MORE]

Haitian Workers Say They Were Shot for Asking to Be Paid

Five Haitian construction workers in the Dominican Republic were shot allegedly for asking for unpaid wages, according to press reports. In addition, an eyewitness told Solidarity Center staff in Santo Domingo, the capital, that on February 2,​ a sergeant of the National Army fir​e​d​ ​upon and wounded ​the five workers​, who were not taken to… [READ MORE]

Dominican Republic Market Vendors Stand up for Rights

Amparo Lara sells plantains in San Cristobal’s Municipal Market, vying for customers along with dozens of other vendors selling mangoes, guavas and a range of vegetables and herbs along with services, such as shoe repair. The increasing lack of full-time jobs around the world has forced many working people like Lara to seek a living in… [READ MORE]

Court Orders Dominican Republic to Recognize Citizenship

The Inter-American Court for Human Rights ordered the Dominican Republic to reform all national laws blocking the recognition of citizenship for children of undocumented parents born in the country. The decision, dated August 28, 2014, was made public on October 22, 2014, according to a story today in El Dia, a national newspaper in the… [READ MORE]

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