Americas

Trade Unions Organizing Workers “Informalized from Above”: Case Studies from Cambodia, Colombia, South Africa and Tunisia (Rutgers, 2013)

Four case studies examine successful union organizing among workers whose jobs have been privatized, outsourced or contracted out. This Solidarity Center report is part of a multiyear research project, funded by the U.S. Agency forInternational Development, to study the informal economy, migration, gender and rule of law together with research partners Rutgers and WIEGO. Download… [READ MORE]

DOMESTIC WORKERS: Winning Recognition and Protection (2013)

Many domestic workers around the world are vulnerable to exploitation and not recognized by national labor laws. But in the Dominican Republic, domestic workers have campaigned to make gains over the last two decades—and a new Solidarity Center report shows how. English (PDF) Arabic (PDF) French (PDF) Spanish (PDF) Sources

Emergent Solidarities: Labor Movement Responses to Migrant Workers in the Dominican Republic and Jordan (Rutgers, 2013)

This report explores examples of unions making significant change in their approaches to migrant worker organizing and how the Solidarity Center has played a role in shifting union thinking about migrant workers and supporting union engagement and activities. Part one of a two-part report. This Solidarity Center report is part of a multiyear research project, funded… [READ MORE]

Solidarity Center Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund: Workers Helping Workers Recover and Rebuild. Final Report, January 2010-March 2013

Following the devastating January 12, 2010, earthquake in Haiti, the Solidarity Center established a relief fund to route donations from U.S. unions and workers to Haitian workers and their families in need. The final report on these efforts, released on the third anniversary of the earthquake, describes how the Solidarity Center and its partners have… [READ MORE]

The Struggle for Worker Rights in Guatemala (2008)

Guatemala’s laws include unreasonable restrictions and requirements on union membership and the right to strike. Women workers are usually paid less than their male counterparts for work of equal value. Indigenous workers and rural workers, with few legal rights, are particular targets of discrimination. Guatemala’s migrant workers—both internal migrants and workers who migrate to work in other countries—suffer some of the worst… [READ MORE]

The Struggle for Worker Rights in Colombia (2006)

Colombian trade unionists face daily threats of violence and assassination, attempts by employers, paramilitaries, guerrillas and the state to stop dissent, silence workers and destroy the only mechanism that gives workers some control over their economic lives: their union. Yet the Colombian labor movement has faced all these challenges by building a broad leadership base with deep rank-and-file roots. Download… [READ MORE]

The Struggle for Worker Rights in Mexico (2003)

The first report in the Solidarity Center’s “Justice for All” series, takes a hard look at Mexico’s century-long fight for independent, democratic trade unions and social justice. Author Lance Compa puts Mexico’s labor law and practice to the test against international worker rights standards reflected in International Labor Organization conventions and the ILO’s 1998 Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Download here.